Week 7

How big is your baby?

Well that’s a contradiction in terms because big is the last thing that your baby is. Measuring from head to bottom (crown to rump, as if in the foetal position) she is around 10mm long (under half an inch)– the size of a blueberry.

How big is your baby?

Well that’s a contradiction in terms because big is the last thing that your baby is. Measuring from head to bottom (crown to rump, as if in the foetal position) she is around 10mm long (under half an inch)– the size of a blueberry.

What does your baby look like?

Her inner ears and eyes are still developing but her forehead dominates her body. Her limb buds are forming cartilage inside and her arm buds are growing longer, while the ends are flattening out in preparation for becoming her tiny little hands.

Changes in your body this week

Your pregnancy is becoming more and more established each day. Your cervical mucus is thickening and will soon form a plug to seal the uterus until birth. By week 7 you could be starting to lose your waistline, but most women don’t notice any change for a few weeks yet.

How your baby is developing

Your baby is busy growing fast. By week 7, development of the vital organ systems is ramping up. Nerves are growing and spreading along her limbs, along with her cartilage.

This is a period of intense development as the structures of her brain and heart become larger and more complex by the day. In fact, your baby’s brain will increase by up to a third in this week alone and she gets 100 new brain cells every minute.

How your baby is developing

Your baby is busy growing fast. By week 7, development of the vital organ systems is ramping up. Nerves are growing and spreading along her limbs, along with her cartilage. This is a period of intense development as the structures of her brain and heart become larger and more complex by the day. In fact, your baby’s brain will increase by up to a third in this week alone and she gets 100 new brain cells every minute.

In 2013, a study conducted at the University of Montreal, Canada, revealed that women who carried out 20 minutes of moderate exercise – brisk walking, swimming or cycling – three times a week from week 13 of their pregnancy had babies who were better able to differentiate sound at 8 to 10 days. old. The researchers believed that this would lead to better learning as this discrimination of sounds would form the basis of language. It was thought that exercise may boost levels of certain important chemical, notably brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which is associated with positive brain function in adults.

Health concerns

Insomnia or particularly vivid dreams can plague you around week 7 of pregnancy and disturb your sleep. Often blamed on pregnancy hormones alone, it’s more likely to be a combination of these chemicals, the changes to your body, and worry or stress about impending parenthood. It’s perfectly normal to feel uncertain in the early weeks of pregnancy; there’s a lot of change ahead of you. Make sure you set aside time to relax properly at the end of the day. A hot, milky drink or warm bath can help you unwind and prepare for a good nights’ sleep.

Are there any symptoms you should be looking out for?

Even though your developing embryo is tiny, your uterus is still expanding to accommodate its new occupant. Your ligaments will be stretching to let this happen and you might feel some mild twinges or cramps. Normally this is nothing to worry about, it’s just something that happens as your uterus is growing. But if the cramps are severe, or accompanied by fresh, red blood then you need to seek medical advice from your doctor immediately.

Safety first

Important though they are, pregnancy hormones can cause some unwelcome side effects, including:

  • Nausea
  • Headaches
  • Tiredness
  • Dry skin

Some of these can be combatted with over the counter medications, but you must always check the information leaflet to be sure that they are safe to take in pregnancy. And if you haven’t been to your GP in a while, don’t forget to mention that you’re pregnant if they prescribe you any medicines.

Some expectant mothers suffer from dizziness during pregnancy. If you feel at all wobbly, then take extra care when you change your position from sitting or lying down. Swing your legs over the edge of the bed and rest there for thirty seconds before you stand. You will also need to avoid using facilities such as jacuzzies, saunas and steam rooms – they aren’t suitable for pregnant women because they push the core body temperature up which isn’t recommended during pregnancy and may also increase any dizziness you’re experiencing.

Important issues this week

If you haven’t told many people that you are pregnant yet, you may start to feel a bit overwhelmed by your secret. Many mums leave telling the world until after their first date scan at around week 12, however, It won’t hurt to tell a few people at this point, certainly close family and friends. Swear them to secrecy and then you can go ahead without the pressure of the pregnancy weighing on you quite so much.

Start to talk planning with your partner or close family – just knowing that other people are also willing to take responsibility can be really useful for lowering your stress levels.

Keeping fit, staying healthy

Pregnant women often worry that exercise will harm the baby – but this is not true. In fact, it’s more unwise to stay inactive! Not exercising can lead to weight gain, high blood pressure, a greater risk of gestational diabetes and create more aches and pains in the long run. Providing there aren’t any medical issues to complicate things, you should be trying to undertake at least 20 to 30 minutes of moderate exercise three times a week – choose activities which are manageable for you and your life, and adjust the pace to suit yourself.

(See the information above about exercise in pregnancy and foetal brain development).

Looking forward; planning ahead

If you thrive on organisation, then this is the time to be compiling lists. You can make a ‘to-do’ list from conception to birth, separated out into a month by month basis to be really clear about what you have to do during the next eight months.

Not sure about baby names or which pram you think you like? Write down anything which intrigues you. Many women suffer from so-called ‘baby brain’ making them a bit absent minded. Add to this the fatigue and nausea, and you’ve got a sure-fire recipe for forgetfulness. Having a notebook to hand and a system of lists could really help you get organised when you’re not feeling your best – and you might even find it amusing to look at your week 7 choice of suitable names when you finally have your baby in your arms.

Important – If you or your child are unwell you should seek medical advice from a professional – contact your GP or visit an A&E department in an emergency. While My BabyManual strives to provide dependable and trusted information on pregnancy and childcare 24/7 via our website pages, we cannot provide individual answers to specific healthcare questions.
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