Week 15

Your baby this week

70

GRAMS IN WEIGHT

Your baby's hearing is also developing in leaps and bounds.

Your baby’s resembles the proportions of a human baby.

Your baby is becoming more sensitive to light.

How big is your baby?

It’s week 15 and your baby’s getting bigger and bigger. By now, she measures roughly 10.1cm (just about 4 inches) and weighs 70 grams (2 ½ oz). In other words, she is about the same size as an apple. As you get deeper into the second trimester, she will undergo a rapid growth spurt.

How big is your baby?

It’s week 15 and your baby’s getting bigger and bigger. By now, she measures roughly 10.1cm (just about 4 inches) and weighs 70 grams (2 ½ oz). In other words, she is about the same size as an apple. As you get deeper into the second trimester, she will undergo a rapid growth spurt.

What does your baby look like?

Previously, your baby’s head has been disproportionately large compared with the rest of her body, but during the last week her limbs and body have caught up and now, at week 15, she more clearly resembles the proportions of a human baby.

Changes in your body this week

Your unpleasant first trimester symptoms may have almost completely gone, and you could be starting to visibly show – ie, it’s really starting to look like a bump. Extra weight gain can cause you to lose your balance while on your feet, so be very wary of this.

There is more blood flow to your womb, cervix, and vagina, which can have the unpleasant side effect of increased vaginal discharge. If the discharge looks and smells normal, then it probably is. If it’s in any way alarming, then this can be the sign of a vaginal infection, such as thrush (see below for more information).

How your baby is developing

Although her eyes are still closed tightly shut, not opening until the latter end of the second trimester, they are becoming sensitive to light.

If you were to shine a bright light at your tummy, your baby would be likely to be aware of it. To help the development of her lungs and respiratory system, she will continue to swallow amniotic fluid.

How your baby is developing

Although her eyes are still closed tightly shut, not opening until the latter end of the second trimester, they are becoming sensitive to light. If you were to shine a bright light at your tummy, your baby would be likely to be aware of it. To help the development of her lungs and respiratory system, she will continue to swallow amniotic fluid.

As well as the sense of sight, her hearing is also developing in leaps and bounds. She is now able to hear the different noises that your body makes, such as the sound of your digestion and the rhythm of your heartbeat.

Your baby will also be able to hear sounds from the outside world. These will only be muted at this relatively early stage of development, as her hearing is still very limited (although, of course, the louder the sound is, the clearer it will be for her).

As your voice reverberates through your body, your baby will hear it. Since she is likely to hear you speak every day, she is bound to get used to your voice in no time. So, by all means, try reading to your baby or singing her a song. She’ll learn to love your sound as it becomes one of the most familiar things to her.

Health concerns

When you’re pregnant, you may experience more vaginal discharge than normal. This is completely harmless and to be expected. However, if it is itchy and painful, then it may be a sign of thrush.

Hormonal changes mean thrush is a common symptom in pregnancy, and, according to the Family Planning Association, it is completely harmless to your baby. Still, it certainly can be an uncomfortable nuisance.

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms of thrush – discharge that is white and thick, itching and soreness around your vagina, and pain during sex and urination – then talk to your doctor or midwife. They will help you get the right treatment, which is likely to involve applying an antifungal cream or inserting a pessary.

Are there any symptoms you should be looking out for?

Nosebleeds are still very much a problem, so if you’re particularly prone, remember to pack a lot of tissues whenever out and about.

Perhaps a more welcome symptom for you and your partner in week 15 is an increased sex drive. Your feelings of desirability may be countered by other symptoms, but if you’re in the mood, it’s a good idea to make the most of it. And it won’t harm the baby as she’s snug and protected inside your womb.

Safety first

Remember that your growing belly is gradually causing your centre of gravity to shift, making you prone to falling whenever you’re up on your feet. Bear this is mind when performing any potentially risky form of exercise, which includes walking. It may be slow paced, but if you’re not used to moving with your new, added weight, you can still easily trip and fall while out on a light stroll.

When on the move, don’t rush yourself. Take everything at a slow and steady pace and make sure you’re wearing comfortable, suitable footwear. High heels won’t help your chances of staying upright. You should also have your mobile on hand while out exercising without supervision so you have a way of calling home or a safety contact number if something goes wrong.

Important issues this week

If you haven’t done so already, it’s a very good idea to get a flu jab. The NHS recommends that all pregnant women should get vaccinated, stating that the flu vaccine has been proven to be perfectly safe.

There are some very significant dangers in not getting a flu jab, as the changes happening to your immune system during pregnancy, as well as to your heart and lungs, make you susceptible to developing a severe illness from flu, such as bronchitis and pneumonia. As well as being dangerous for you, a bout of the flu can also harm your baby, increasing the risk of complications. A flu shot will help protect you and your baby both during and after birth.

Keeping fit, staying healthy

Now that you’re a few weeks into your second trimester, you should’ve settled in to a comfortable exercise routine. But if you haven’t, it’s not too late. Any exercise is better than staying sedentary, so it doesn’t have to be anything strenuous; it could be something as simple as a half-hour walk several times a week with a few essential pelvic floor exercises fitted in during each day.

If you want to try something a little more social than you could join an antenatal aerobics or dance class. Remember to have a look at the My BabyManual weekly fitness articles for great ideas on how to stay fit in pregnancy.

Looking forward; planning ahead

Eating healthily is important for you and your baby, but this isn’t always easy. You don’t have to completely overhaul your diet, but changing your eating habits to restrict the amount of processed foods will be a really beneficial move.

Try to avoid fast food as much as you can and, instead, opt for healthy alternatives. To avoid being tempted by unhealthy options during your lunch break, you could try making your own packed lunch. You want to involve all the four major food groups, so include some fresh fruit and sandwiches made with wholemeal bread, possibly with a filling that’s high in protein. You can never go far wrong with salads. Vitamin D is vital for pregnancy, so consider taking a supplement.

Important – If you or your child are unwell you should seek medical advice from a professional – contact your GP or visit an A&E department in an emergency. While My BabyManual strives to provide dependable and trusted information on pregnancy and childcare 24/7 via our website pages, we cannot provide individual answers to specific healthcare questions.
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